Losing their Hearts in San Francisco:  The San Francisco Maru of Truk Lagoon


“Come back.  Even as a shadow, even as a dream.”  ~Euripides, Greek classical tragedian playwright

Built in Japan in 1919 by the Kawasaki Dockyard, The SS (Steam Ship) San Francisco Maru was a medium-sized freighter of the time specifically designed for the Japanese Yamashista Kisen Line.   She was a 385ft, 27ft beam, 5,800+ ton passenger-cargo ship that served as part of Japan’s wider commercial fleet involved in world-wide trade.  The word “Maru,” meaning “circle” in Japanese, has been used to designate a Japanese merchant vessel since the 16th century.  Although the exact reasoning of this particular ship-naming convention is lost to time, the idea of a safe circular journey for ships and their crews is probably not far from the mark.  As to the city-name?  The Japanese at the time often named ships to reflect their primary destinations.

The San Francisco Maru

The San Francisco Maru

During World War II the Japanese were in desperate need to meet the logistical needs of their new Pacific empire, suddenly stretched far, wide, and thin.  Many commercial vessels were thus taken into service of the Emperor, a fate no different for the San Francisco.  Following her requisition by the Imperial Japanese Navy, the ship was detailed to transport military cargoes between the Japanese homeland and far-flung Pacific destinations.  Like most of the other Japanese merchants during WWII, the San Francisco was armed, in this case with a single 75mm/3” deck gun forward to both defend against surface submarine attack, and to provide an opportunity to attack and capture other unsuspecting merchants she happened to meet along the way.

Although damaged by aerial bombing in 1943 while delivering supplies in New Guinea, the San Francisco suffered her fatal blows after arriving at Truk Lagoon (current day Chuuk, part of the Federated States of Micronesia) in February 1944.  Packed with war materials, including cargo holds full of bombs, mines and torpedoes, she arrived just days before a massive American attack on this Japanese stronghold.  During Operation “Hailstone” (ラック島空襲 Torakku-tō Kūshū, lit. “the airstrike on Truk Island”) between 17-18 February 1944, waves upon waves of US Navy carrier-based planes were launched against shipping found at Truk, as well as the significant military presence Japan had built up there since the end of World War I.  After the first day’s attacks, the San Francisco was observed and reported by US forces as being on fire with smoke belching amidships.  The next day, she was reportedly hit by at least six 500-lb bombs, and was left burning furiously and sinking stern first.  At least five crew members were killed.  Operation Hailstone is often referred to as the “Japanese Pearl Harbor” due to the massive damage inflicted on the Japanese fleet.

Basic Orientation of the Wreck Today

Basic Orientation of the Wreck Today

It’s position lost to the fog of war made even more obscure by the passage of time, the wreck was “discovered” in 1969 by Cousteau (no doubt with the help of locals who all but knew her location), but was not dived again until 1973 when the ship’s bell was recovered and her identity confirmed.

Bow Gun of the San Francisco

Bow Gun of the San Francisco

The San Francisco lies very deep, and rests on an even keel with the superstructure beginning at ~140fsw, weather deck at ~165fsw, and the sea bottom around 210fsw.  Upon descent, her wreck remains invisible, and only passing about 50’fsw do her twin masts first come into view, themselves reaching up only to 105’fsw.  Heading from the forward mast to the bow, you cross over the open access to cargo hold 1 and finally reach the vessel’s most impressive and picturesque deck gun at ~150fsw.  Most deck guns of the wrecks in Truk are covered with an immense amount of growth, but due to the depths of the San Francisco, this is not that case of her wreck.

Hemispherical Mines of the Forward Cargo Hold

Hemispherical Mines of the Forward Cargo Hold

After touring the gun – a must on this shipwreck in Truk – one should immediately descend down into hold 1 forward, where you will find a cargo space packed with hemispherical landmines, at one time destined to help defend the beaches and shallow waters of Truk Lagoon against potential Allied invasion.  Watch the depth here though; the hold descends down to almost 200fsw!  Exiting up and aft out of hold , immediately proceed aft and around the forward mast to hold 2, where divers will find a plethora of scattered aerial bombs, complete with tail fins and the remains of their original wooden packing crates, along with the remains of Japanese trucks in the hold’s ‘tween decks.  Still deeper, drums of fuel can be seen.

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Perhaps the highlight of visiting the San Francisco, however, are the three iconic Japanese tanks still found resting on the ship’s main deck.  These tanks, built by Mitsubishi, are Japanese Light Type 95 HA-Go tanks covered in with ½” armor.  They appear toyishly small in appearance, but would have been manned by a crew of three and could make up to 30mph on a six-cylinder, air-cooled 120hp diesel engine.  Weighing ~7.5 tons, the tanks were armed with three weapons:  a 37mm main battery turreted gun, and two 7.7mm machine guns, one forward (non-coaxial) and one rear-facing.  The tank was only mildly effective against infantry and was never designed for armored battles, and with an extremely cramped interior, only the lightest armor, and a hand-operated turret, the tank suffered enormously in battle as more modern battlefield weapons came into play.  Two tanks are found on the starboard side of the ship, with one to port.  This is perhaps the most photogenic part of the wreck, and if your bottom time is already limited (as it is on this wreck), make sure to reserve at least a few minutes for these infamous tanks.

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From here, our planned dive run time required us to start our long ascent to the surface, where we completed our accelerated decompression profiles as we went.  It’s hard to leave the wreck, especially seeing the cratered remains of the superstructure (severely damaged from bombing), and knowing that the rear cargo holds contain a mixture of trucks, crates of ammunition, more mines, some depth charges, and scattered torpedoes….  How this wreck failed to detonate under such intense bombing is hard to imagine.  Equally as befuddling is the lack of other visible damage from the other reported bomb hits of the 2nd day’s attacks.

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But exploring the 2nd half of this ship, where those five unfortunate souls who lost their hearts in San Francisco can be remembered as a shadowy dream, will have to wait for my return to Truk Lagoon.  Until then, stayed tuned for more “Traces of War” from this year’s adventures exploring this iconic battle site.

Sharknado!!!


Okay, so it’s more like a shark circus.  Or at least that is what it’s called  aboard the MV Orion, a scuba live-aboard in the Emperor’s fleet that we were guests on this past September.  Jody and I booked this scuba vacation (her first live-aboard) coincident with our 5th anniversary, to a far away, exotic location that many Americans have never heard of:  The Maldives.  Go ahead, look it up on a map…I’ll wait.

There will be a lot more written about this particular vacation, but this video is all I wish to share at this point.  Oh, and listen with the music turned all the way up.  I have something in excess of 1,500 scuba dives from all over the world, but this dive easily tops the list.  The video was shot from sunset going on to full night, with a large domed wide-angle lens, so the action was really much closer than it often appears.

What else can I say, except what Jessica said upon surfacing from this dive:

BEST … DIVE … EVER!

 

Vienna (Sausage) of Truk Lagoon


“A kitten is in the animal world what a rosebud is in the garden.”  ~Robert Southey

I love cats.  And it’s just not that like “there, I said it…” as I had over my man-card to the manly authorities.  I state it proudly and openly.  And on my diving excursion to Truk Lagoon earlier this year, I meet a rosebud of a kitten which I came to affectionately call Vienna.

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Me and My Feline Friend Vienna

I don’t have many pictures of this little boy cat.  He didn’t pose well, struggling as he was to just survive.  But he was a looker.  Obviously too lean due to a restricted diet, he had a very long snout on a very triangular head, making him appear much more “wild” than the average domesticated short-hair.  And he was part of a pack of three or four strays that seem to inhabit the Blue Lagoon Resort, the “resort” (I use that word loosely) where we were staying before and after our liveaboard scuba diving cruise aboard the dive boat Odyssey.

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I’m a sucker for cats, wherever I go.  I’ve made many cat friends over the years, and in many countries – most places I’ve spent any amount of time, in fact.  This skinny boy cat scurrying about the resort caught my attention.  And making my patented “pssssst-psssst” cat-call (which works pretty much every time), this little boy of about 4-6 months came trotting up like a best friend.  Unshyly rubbing my leg and looking up to bellow a meow too voluminous for his body, I immediately knew he’d be my feline friend for my stay.

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Knowing he was hungry, I started to brainstorm about how to help this little guy out.  Taking food from our normal meals taken at the resort’s only restaurant was easy, but that was hours away (the cats actually would congregate around dinner time in the area).  So instead, I headed to the small shop the resort had where various souvenirs and snacks were sold, nothing really to suite a cat’s taste, or a kitten’s nutritional needs.

Then I noticed the cans and cans and cans of Vienna Sausage in the glass display case found at the cashier’s.  PURRR-FECT I thought, right?!

I’m not sure what’s in those tiny little minced-meat formed tubes of soft flesh (or muscle, or fat, or various animal parts unmentioned!), but I know that my ex-wife fed them to my son when he was a little toddler and could handle his own finger food.  Oddly enough, I don’t remember my daughter getting any as a child – maybe a reflection of our increased socioeconomic status perhaps….  Me, well, I’m sure I’ve tasted them(??), but I sure don’t remember that taste-test.  And before you say, “…how can you feed something to your child that you won’t eat,” I ask how many dads out there have actually tasted all those mushy, slimly and smelly baby foods we gleefully shovel down our offspring’s throats?!

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Hence this kitten’s newfound name.  Of course he loved the sausages.  And he loved me for the chance to love those sausages.  Literally.  After filling his belly with a can (or two) of that fatty, moist goodness, he would be ready for a nap after expressing his thanks as only a cat can.  And nap we did together – in the resorts various hammocks found along the beaches of the property.  And once I was sure he was relatively clean from parasites (definitely no fleas or ticks at least), he was invited into the room with me.

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Vienna would purr and purr, and when I would stop rubbing him, he would bat at my hand with his head, a cat’s demand for more.  But only for a few minutes, because then he was crashed into his cat nap.  I’m sure the dual security of having had a full meal AND a human to cling with made for some much-needed deep, restful sleep.  I’ve had many cats in my life, and I have two right now.  But I’ll tell you that Vienna was more trusting, more loving and more affectionate than most – including those two at home right now (hear that, Cleo and Naka??).  I will forever be amazed at how much peace and tranquility can come from the sound of a cat’s simple purr as their warm, soft fur brushes up against your skin.  It was the perfect counterpoint to the week’s focus on war, destruction and death which any trip to diving the WWII wrecks of Truk Lagoon involves.  And I remain convinced that some of the very best, irrefutable proof of a god is found in the dedicated and unconditional love of an animal….

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I said my hard and saddened goodbyes to Vienna when it was time to leave, and I swear that if I could have in any easy fashion, I would’ve taken him home with me.  From Chuuk (part of the Federated States of Micronesia), it is, however, a 3-plane-ride trip home, including an overnight stay in Guam, ending up in Japan, which has some of the strictest animal importation rules I’ve ever dealt with.  It simply was not possible, and sadly so.

But I was also able to smile, having had the opportunity of knowing this small creature, if only for a very little time.  I only hope that Vienna was able to continue to thrive living on the grounds and gardens of the Blue Lagoon Resort in Chuuk.  If you happen to visit BLR, be on the lookout for a sleek, wildish but friendly grey male short-haired tabby of sorts, frisky and playful, and with a purr to melt your heart.  If you do see him, do me a favor and buy a can of Vienna Sausages from the shop and leave them out for him.  He’ll be your BFF, and perhaps, just perhaps, he’ll remember me and the short time we had together.

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Whale of a Time! Diving with Okinawan Whale Sharks


Dive the Blues 2015, Whale Shark Dive, head to head 2 WM

The animal passed closed abeam to me, close enough that I could stretch out an arm and allow my hand to brush against the length of its flesh as it swam by. I was breathing slowly, trying to take in as much sensory perception as I could, this being my first time swimming with such massive creatures. But just as the gentle giant was halfway past, it decided on a rather abrupt change of course. In doing so, its tail started a full swing in my direction with speed and force. Seeing it coming and knowing I was no more than a rubber ducky in bathtub, I turned to take the impact on my back. “UGH” I went as the tail struck solidly, and then smoothly shoved me aside. Spinning back around, I was able to see the tail, as tall as I, complete its strong follow-through. Truly a massive and powerful creature!

The whale shark is a slow-moving filter feeding shark and the largest known living fish, the largest confirmed had a length of 41½ feet, weighing in at about 47,000 pounds. Unconfirmed reports of considerably larger whale sharks abound (and manatees are thought to have provided the basis for mermaids – riiiigggghhhhht). They are, by far, the largest living non-mammalian vertebrate, and are thought to have originated about 60 million years ago.

Dive the Blues 2015, Whale Shark Dive, watching from the net WM

They are found in open waters of the tropical oceans where water is warmer than 71°F. With lifespans believed to approach 70 years, sexual maturity is not reached until they are about 30. Whale sharks have very large mouths which they use to filter-feed mainly on plankton. Despite its size, the whale shark does not pose significant danger to humans. Whale sharks are docile fish; younger whale sharks are gentle and often play with scuba divers. They are considered harmless to humans.

Dive the Blues 2015, Whale Shark Dive, Tori with the Shark WM

Okinawa has one of the most fabulous aquariums in the world, one of the few which display multiple whale sharks in captivity. The Ocean Expo Park Churaumi Aquarium (沖縄美ら海水族館) welcomed its 20 millionth visitor already in March of 2010, and was for a time the largest aquarium in the world until the Georgia Aquarium opened in 2005. Chura means “beautiful” or “graceful” in the Okinawan dialect, and umi means “ocean.”

Dive the Blues 2015, Whale Shark Dive, diver dwarfed WM

And while the whale shark can be experienced in the wild in various places around the globe, in all my travels and 1,000 dives, I’ve encountered only one off Pensacola diving the USS Oriskany. But Jody got to see a migrating pod of 10 or so in the Red Sea while deployed to Africa a few years ago. Yes, there are snorkel and scuba charters that claim to guarantee wild sightings. Admittedly, I’ve never taken one of these “focused” trips, but a close encounter with these gentle giants has always been on my list of “to do” underwater adventures. It just has never risen to the “must do” status. Until recently.

A divemaster I trained, Ms. Tori (what a cool name to have in the Far East!) was leaving Okinawa to go back to the states, and the week prior she decided to book a whale shark dive and asked me to come along. Sure! It’s summer, the water is warm under sunny blue skies, and the whale shark pen is just down the road and slightly offshore from where I live. Most Americans book the experience through the “Torii Scuba Locker,” one of the military-run dive shops (this one affiliated with the Army) on the island. But there are many Japanese tours that are more than happy to host westerners with English-speaking staff. Even when you book through Torii Station, a local Japanese boat is used, although you are escorted and guided by an American Divemaster for the trip.

Dive the Blues 2015, Whale Shark Dive, hectic feeding time 2 wM

But where do these sharks come from, and why are they kept in a net off Okinawa? To some, it just seems cruelly unnecessary. But many whale sharks are caught accidentally by Okinawan fishing nets. Before they are released, they are held in an open ocean net enclosure, where the claim is that they are fed and cared for to ensure their safety. Some are rotated into the Churaumi Aquarium to give animals held there a break, or sent to Osaka’s aquarium, but the vast majority are released. While they are held, dive and snorkel trips are offered to those who wish to pay.

Dive the Blues 2015, Whale Shark Dive, head to head 4 WM

The dive trip starts at Torii Scuba Locker, where anything you may need can be easily and cheaply rented. After filling out the standard dive industry paperwork, a group briefing is provided which clearly lays out the flow of the dive. The only real concern of this particular dive that diving will occur in an overhead environment with no direct access to the surface. Further, with some chance of temporary entanglement with the net can occur. Both concerns are easily addressed by the Divemaster – part of why you’ll be well escorted for your trip. Caravanning to the nearby Yomitan Fishing Port, you’ll park in proximity to the dive boat and setup your kit. The actual boat ride to the site is measured in single digit minutes, so it’s important to be ready to go! And, although it’s a short boat ride, it can be rough: take your Dramamine at least an hour before boarding.

Dive the Blues 2015, Whale Shark Dive, head to head WM

I won’t lie here or paint a pretty picture: Japanese dive boats can be chaotically crowded. There is usually more than one boat going at a time, although the divers will be loaded on the vessel nearest the dock. Japanese dive boats have no seats and have a completely open deck plan. Loading last, we put our gear wherever we could, taking a seat on the boat’s gunwale for the short jaunt to the whale shark enclosure. A low backroll will get you quickly into the water, and after the Divemaster joins you, a quick descent and check of the group is completed en route to the underwater opening at the top of the cylinder-shaped netted pen.

The top of the pen is about 15 feet below the surface, where the first distant, hazy glimpses of the giants can be had! The whale sharks kept here, while not anywhere near record size, still dwarf the divers as they enter the cage. We swam with two individuals, one smaller I would estimate at about 18’, and the other quite larger, at least 25-28’ in length! The actual enclosure is much larger than you might think; it’s impossible to see completely across the 330 feet from side to side, while the floor of the net bottoms out at 65-70’.

Dive the Blues 2015, Whale Shark Dive, waiting to get in

We waited at the net while the lead Japanese Divemaster opened the entry and cleared the way. Passing head down through a small hole in the top edge of the net, our group gathered inside, where we observed feeding for about 10 minutes. Unfortunately, the small bite-sized nature of the krill intended for the whale sharks (remember, they are filter feeders), also serves as the perfect meal for many other species of fish. An abundance of other fish, all hangers-on, continually clouded our view in their hopes of bagging some spillover.

Dive the Blues 2015, Whale Shark Dive, head to head 3 WM

When the feeding concludes, a loud rattle is heard underwater, the signal that the pen was now open for free-swim. The whale sharks were not shy; if they thought you had food, they would approach rather straightforwardly, sometimes with their mouths wide-open. But neither were they aggressive; when they realized you had no food, off they went.

Dive the Blues 2015, Whale Shark Dive, hectic feeding time WM

As the larger shark tended to stay shallow, I descended to near the bottom of the pen, where I was almost alone. There was only one other Japanese diver, a female, and we enjoyed the smaller animal that swam this lower depth’s perimeter. Having the animal brush right by and interact with them eye-to-eye was astonishing.

Free-swim lasts about 20 minutes, and sure enough around a half hour into the dive we heard another series of rattles from the Japanese. Sadly, time to leave our new aquatic friends. Of course I worked it out so that I was the last visitor to depart, leaving only a single Japanese staffer behind me to tidy up the exit. We completed our three-minute safety stop; although you can spend the majority of your time at 20’ on this dive, excursions to 65’ can easily be made.

Dive the Blues 2015, Whale Shark Dive, hectic feeding time 3 WM

Of course there is controversy about keeping these animals in captivity, like there is surrounding the treatment of any animal, from the declawing of cats to cattle raised for slaughter, to mammals in zoos, to these giants penned in the wild. For instance, a study of 16 whale sharks kept at the Okinawa Aquarium from 1980 to 1998 found they survived, on average, only 502 days in captivity. In this regard, Okinawa is clearly a world-class leader, holding the record for whale shark long-term exhibition at over 10 years!

Dive the Blues 2015, Whale Shark Dive, Divemaster Brenden leading the dive

Some conservationists feel that it is unnecessary and even cruel to take animals from the wild and showcase them. Some say that it’s more about the benjamins, not conservation or education. The truth is, as I like to say, somewhere in the middle. I believe that those who have a chance to swim with whale sharks will never forget the magical encounter. For me personally, I held off from diving with these sharks for many years, in part because of this controversy. However, after my own captivating experience, I intend to become much more of an ambassador of and more ardent supporter for the protection of these majestic animals. And hopefully it is true that most of the animals kept off Okinawa are generally kept only a short time and released. Hopefully.

Dive the Blues 2015, Whale Shark Dive, hectic feeding time 2 wM

Reservations to dive (sorry, no snorkeling option) with the whale sharks must be mad 24 hours in advance. The Torii Scuba Locker is closed on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. The trip is $135 per person and includes tanks, and the shop requires an Advanced certification OR more than 20 dives experience. The To dive with the whale sharks, contact Torii’s Scuba Locker at 644-4263 and ask for Ashley – she’ll take good care of you!

Dive the Blues 2015, Whale Shark Dive, diving with Torii Station and the Hypes

Read More:

http://marinesciencetoday.com/2013/02/18/swimming-with-whale-sharks-beneficial-or-cruel/#ixzz3jcDEccX0

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/29/us/29shark.html?_r=2&oref=slogin&

A “JAW-some Valentine’s:” Diving with Hammerheads at Yonaguni


“We provoke a shark every time we enter the water where sharks happen to be, for we forget: The Ocean is not our territory – it’s theirs.” ~ Peter Benchley

“We should be afraid of sharks half as much as sharks should be afraid of us.” ~ Peter Benchley

Yonaguni Japan 2015, Jawsome Valentine

Life is Like a Box of Chocolates….

“Valentine, you’re JAW-SOME!”

So read the cover of the box of chocolates that Jody hauled all the way down to Yonaguni Island…. Deciding to spend the long lovers’ weekend to dive specifically with migrating hammerhead sharks in the waters around the extreme southwestern Japanese islands, this was indeed the perfect valentine gift. A picture was immediately posted on Facebook, and “JAW-SOME” became the catch-phrase of the trip to describe our dives with such wondrous apex predators of the mysterious deep.

Yonaguni - more Chinese than Japan!

Yonaguni – more Chinese than Japan!

Yonaguni Japan 2015, arriving in YonaguniYonaguni Japan 2015, Scuba Diving, unpacking at our hotel - test shot with the underwater cameraYonaguni (与那国島, sometimes Yunaguni) is one of the Yaeyama Islands, famous for being the westernmost inhabited island of Japan. Located only a mere 67 miles from Taiwan, that island-nation and general thorn in China’s side is visible from this part of Japan on a Chinese-pollution-free day (see Smoke Gets in Your Eyes for more on Japan’s smoggy skies). Yonaguni is exceedingly popular with divers exactly because of the large numbers of hammerhead sharks that school there during winter. February and March are said to offer the best times to swim with the sharks, often times schooling in numbers verging on the uncountable. Not only are the sharks present daily during this period, most of the shark dive sites are located just minutes from port, situated over steep cliff-like underwater drop-offs, allowing for great visibility, big pelagics, and strong currents in which to cruise.

This is what we all dreamed of!

This is what we all dreamed of!

Dives one and two (of eight total) during our 4 night stay were on the Yonaguni Monument – more on that is an upcoming blog. The next six dives over three consecutive days were all about stopping…because…(wait for it)…it was Hammer Time! Or they involved shark hunting. The kind where the only shots taken are with cameras and the only stuffing was of our large western bodies into Asian-sized souvenir t-shirts!

Our Dive Site, Affectionately nicknamed "Shark Point"

Our Dive Site, Affectionately nicknamed “Shark Point”

The weather was beautiful for diving, almost couldn’t have been better. A rainless weekend with temperatures actually reaching up into the 70s, we were all surprised that even the seas around Yonaguni were about five degrees warmer than the cold winter waters of Okinawa this time of year. Although the winds shifted and started to blow and its fetch raised a healthy sea, it was only bad enough to cause one case of sea-sickness in our group of eleven divers.

A Money-Shot from our Dives!

A Money-Shot from our Dives!

The hammerheads of Japan’s southern seas are of the “scalloped” variety Sphyrna lewini, part of the family Sphyrnidae. Not surprisingly, the Greek sphyrna translates as “hammer”. The most obvious feature of this shark, as in all the other kinds of hammerheads, is the “hammer” shape of their head. Although smaller than the Great and Smooth hammerhead species, scalloped hammers are fairly large at around 14 feet and well over 300 pounds, and is the most common of all hammerheads, consisting of nine species total.

Shark Hunting:  Drifting in the Strong Currents, Mid-Water at ~60'

Shark Hunting: Drifting in the Strong Currents, Mid-Water at ~60′

Me Chillin' in the Drift

Me Chillin’ in the Drift

Hammer Hunts dives 1 and 2 were almost identical disappointing repeats of each other. Taking a left out the port and heading southeast, we dropped in just about ½ mile offshore in water so deep that the bottom often couldn’t be seen even at 80’ but which ripped by at what we estimate as 8-10 knots. We all would corral into a loose group at 30’ with the Divemaster, then head down to 60’ to drift and wait. And wait and wait we did, for the next 30 minutes each time. At that point “time” was called by our Japanese divemaster, making a “T” with his hands. We slowly ascended up to our safety stops, and then surfaced together to await pickup by the dive boat, quickly backing down on our group bobbing in the 2-4 foot seas.

The Scramble for the Boat Begins

The Scramble for the Boat Begins

“Okay! Go to the boat. Go! GO! GOOOOO!” the divemaster pleaded with us as both we the divers and the boat captain fought the ripping current. Once aboard we all agreed: yes, there were shadowy sightings here and there by some members of the group, but no real confirmed sightings of anything concrete and in the numbers all of us expected.

Find the Shark Shadow

Find the Shark Shadow

Yonaguni Japan 2015, Scuba Diving, Jody suiting up for our dives 2The scalloped hammerhead primarily lives in warm temperate and tropical coastal waters, down to a depths exceeding 1,500 feet. These sharks have a very high metabolic rate, which governs much of their behavior. Hammerheads feed on cephalopods, such as squid and octopus, and fish such as sardines, mackerel and herring. Larger sharks also feed on smaller sharks, such as smaller reef sharks. During the day they are more often found close to shore, but at night they become solitary hunters moving further offshore and into deeper waters.

On Yet Another Shark Hunt

On Yet Another Shark Hunt

For shark hunts 3 and 4 we all were getting more eager (and maybe less patient) to see sharks. Some of our group met some Japanese ladies who, the previous day, had dropped into a huge group of schooling hammerheads! And this very morning another group with our dive charter spotted 5 swimming together. Our chances had improved. Or so we thought.

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Our Selfie, Underwater!

Our Selfie, Underwater!

While these sharks can pose a danger to humans (Scallops are one of three hammers that have bitten humans), they are not normally considered aggressive. But that’s not what we’ll tell all our friends! Nor is that what most people will think regardless of any bizarre statistic illuminating the chances of a shark attack that you may choose to quote. Like my personal favorite: a person stands more of a chance of dying from falling coconuts than he or she does of a shark bite…. It’s true; check it out! Hammerheads, if confronted or provoked, respond by dropping their pectoral fins and swimming with stiff, jerking motions – a clear warning that a diver should retreat or seek shelter.

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“OHHHH-kay, ev-re one! Red-EEE?” our Japanese guide inquired while standing on the top of the boarding ladder at the stern of the boat. “OHHHH-kay, let’s GO!” he finally responds to our impatient replies, then counted quickly in Japanese, “Ichi-nei-san!” And with his “one-two-three” he disappeared into the foamy white waters churned by the boat’s screw and stern dive ladders. We all followed in quick succession, dive-bombing the ocean much like skydivers exiting an aircraft as quickly as they could. And believe me, we certainly were no more graceful!

This Shadow Came Back Around for Another Pass!!

With whitish bellies and greenish-grey dorsal coloring, hammerheads quickly blend into the reduced visibility ever-present in the murky ocean depths. I’m convinced this type of melding with the environment is exactly why combat aircraft are painted the same greenish-grey coloring: to blend in with the haze always at the horizon. These sharks have an uncanny ability to simply disappear with a sweep or two of their tails. No wonder we saw so many creepily teasing shadows!

That's Me Framed in the Extreme Lower Right of the Photo

That’s Me Framed in the Extreme Lower Right of the Photo

stop-hammerhead-timeHammerheads have better vision than most and can actually see 360 degrees; by looking up or down, they can monitor the complete seaspace all around them. Like all sharks, hammerheads have electroreceptory sensory pores and nostrils on their snouts. But in hammerheads these sensors are spread out over a much wider area, allowing these sharks to hunt more effectively. This special arrangement of sensors allows for the detection of as little as a billionth of a volt, and when combined with excellent smell, the sharks can quickly classify and hone in on distressed, diseased, or decaying organics and other bodily fluids. And yes, to answer your question, those fluids primarily include blood.

Shark Hunting from our Rock Stand

Shark Hunting from our Rock Stand

Drifting quickly with the fast-moving currents, we drop again deep to about 70’. And then THERE. There was one. In the murky distance. And as quickly as all of us could grab a tenuous handhold on a massive nearby stone block, the shark was gone. There wasn’t ever enough contrast for any of our cameras to focus. And you know what divers say about underwater claims: didn’t happen it there isn’t photographic proof! We released our grips and were immediately flying again with the swift currents, and surfaced once again with only a couple of sporadic sightings and lots of talk about shadows darting here and there.

Back Aboard for Yet Another Try

Back Aboard for Yet Another Try

On the Hunt

On the Hunt

But these nebulous sightings weren’t what any of us had come so far for. Personally, I’ve had the pleasure of diving with many sharks along the southeastern coast of the United States, where sharks (grey reefs, nurse, and bulls mostly) are seen routinely. I’ve also had the opportunity to partake in no less than three “shark feeds,” a rare chance to see a shark feeding-frenzy, live, up close and personal. No, we all were in Yonaguni to see schools of hammerheads, not just their fuzzy ghosted shadows at the edge of our perception.

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Unfortunately, hammerhead sharks are massively overfished, slaughtered simply for just their fins. These sharks are captured, “finned” where their dorsal, pectoral and tail fins are all sliced off, and then the shark’s body – still alive – is thrown back into the sea to die a slow, painful death. Because of this savagely wasteful practice, the scalloped hammerhead is on the “globally endangered” species list, with population declines of up to 95% over the past 30 years. Hammerheads are among the most commonly caught sharks for finning. But they are also used in food products (“flake,” fish fingers, fish & chips), and commonly killed as by-catch due to indiscriminate fishing practices.

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d011345920070228091707Yonaguni Japan 2015, Scuba Diving, peaceful scuba diver Jody WMOur last day on the island had arrived, and we only had two dives left. This was it. The weather was moving in, winds were up and the seas had started to kick. Some boats were not going out to the area where the sharks congregate, but our diving service was still gaming for the hunt. We were pleading to be taken to another dive site, as the last four dives at the same location yielded just about squat. The staff at YDS – Yonaguni Diving Service – agreed and our boat’s captain decided on a different locale. Making the quick trip from port, we got ready once again. The boat was a-rockin’ as we scrambled off the stern, but on dive five, again only a single hammer was sighted, one much deeper and more shy who fled no doubt upon sensing not our presence but our desperation!

Tim Shooting a Scalloped Hammerhead

Tim Shooting a Scalloped Hammerhead

Killing millions of sharks every year just for their fins is an immoral waste and non-sustainable practice. Shark fin soup is merely a status symbol in Asia, one reserved for only royalty. The fins don’t even add flavor, but instead are dried and used as only a texture. While shark fin soup is an expensive delicacy at up to $100 a serving, more and more people, groups, and even restaurants are giving up the dish and calling for a ban on the practice of finning.

Jody is Ready for Some Shark Schooling!

Jody is Ready for Some Shark Schooling!

Hammerhead Sign!

Hammerhead Sign!

Divers Happy about the Sharks!

Divers Happy about the Sharks!

And then the last dive was upon us. This was it. A $1,400 per person five-day trip with three days of rather exhaustive diving had all come down to this one final sub-30 minute dive. The pressure was on for YDS; their and our divemaster’s reputation for amazing shark dives was on the line. We returned to this new location in even rougher seas and dropped in once again. And very soon after reaching our drift depth…. One. Then two more. No wait, there are FIVE! Yes, we had found them – there they were, schooling together!! Our divemaster tapped on his tank with his simple noise maker – a long steel bolt tied to his buoyancy compensator. I only glanced his way having already spotted the sharks, enough to see him make the hammerhead sign he had briefed. I was lucky enough to be on the side of the group where the sharks were schooling, and immediately but slowly starting making way in their direction as I descended deeper and deeper to match their depths. Snapping photos and admiring their sleek and powerful beauty, I checked my computer as I was passing 110’, plenty deep enough with our time and air constraints. We were warned the sharks would drag us deeper and deeper, and as these sharks continued downward there was still no bottom in sight as I leveled out at 116’.

A Small School, but Still a School!

A Small School, but Still a School!

Ed Chills Vertically

Ed Chills Vertically

The Divemaster Saves Face!!

The Divemaster Saves Face!!

This school of scalloped hammerheads, although small by Yonaguni standards, was an amazingly invigorating sight. While an accurate count is hard to come by, we agreed that there were at least ten in our immediate vicinity. A few even hung around to make another pass, seemingly as interested in us as we were in them, an event I decided to video with my ten-year, non-HD small point-and-shoot underwater (see my underwater photos of Japan at Dive The Blues Scuba). To divers, this experience is akin to those seeing a lion up-close-and-personal on safari in the Serengeti plains of Africa. It is hard to describe the surge of emotions one feels when faced with an uncaged, untamed wild apex predator on their own turf (as it were) and terms. And in numbers that could not be defended against. It may be difficult for some people to grasp, but stepping foot in the ocean at the beach in just a bathing suit is really no different from walking into the jungles of Southeast Asia wearing just the same. And who would do that, right? The sea is not our domain nor do we belong there, and when we tread into the jungles, terrestrial or aquatic, we must be ever wary and always respectful.

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We rely on the earths’ oceans, every bit as much as the hammerheads do. The earth’s weather, our fresh water, much of the world’s food supply, and even the very air we breathe are all sourced from the seas. Sharks play a critically irreplaceable role in the ocean’s massive aquatic ecosystems, and have every bit a right to be here as you and I. They deserve our respect as much as they get our admiration.

Yonaguni Japan 2015, Scuba Diving, Jody and I enjoying our time with the hammerheads

Shark fin soup? No thanks.

I’ll take an inexpensive box of “JAW-SOME” chocolates any day….

Yonaguni Japan 2015, group shot at YDS at the end of our adventure

Our Dive Group with our Japanese Guide!

 

Traces of War: Wreck of the USS Emmons


 

Okinawa Battlesites 2015, USS Emmons, whale tail WM

USS Emmons, DD-457

USS Emmons, DD-457

It sounded as if they were grieving for the dead entombed in the ocean’s depths. The whale song, loud yet gently rolling in amplitude, was mesmerizing as I hung on the line decompressing from my first dive on the WWII war relic the USS Emmons. We had spotted the whales prior to entry, and they were close. They stayed close. It was as if they were also diving on the war grave, but unlike their terrestrial mammal-cousins, they could lend a uniquely solemn eulogy in fitting tribute to what turned out as a very emotional morning.

5 Inch 38 Caliber Mount forward on the bow

5 Inch 38 Caliber Mount forward on the bow

USS Emmons (DD-457/DMS-22) was a Gleaves-class destroyer of the United States Navy, named for the 19th century American Rear Admiral George F. Emmons. Emmons was authorized in the Navy Expansion Act of 1938, launched in the fall of 1941, built by Bath Iron Works, sponsored by Mrs. Francis Emmons Peacock, granddaughter of Admiral Emmons, and finally commissioned in December 1941, just as American was entering World War Two. Costing just under $5 million when her construction contract was let, she was later reconfigured and reclassified as a Destroyer Mine-Sweeper (DMS-22) in the fall of 1944 prior to her demise.

In February 2001, Emmons’ wreck was discovered at a depth approaching 150’ just north of Okinawa’s Motobu peninsula, one of the few American ships lost off Okinawan waters shallow enough for access by experienced divers. She rests on her starboard side, pretty much still in the condition of the day of her ruin. As such, live and unexploded ordnance can be found, and caution is in order visiting. Diving at this depth is at the extreme of every recreational scuba diving limit, and should only be accomplished by divers with some technical background or guidance from others that know the site and the hazards such diving entails. Having a technical background from diving the deep wrecks off South Florida at 200’ plus, I was more than comfortable diving at this sacred site.

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The Emmons in her original configuration prior to 1945

Emmons embodied the best in pre-WWII destroyer construction. As experiences of the war dictated, changes were made to adapt Emmons to changing conditions. Equipped with two geared turbines and four boilers, she was capable of generating 50,000 shaft-horsepower, pushing her through the water at more than 37.5 knots (43+ mph). At a length of 348’2″, beam 36’1″; and maximum draft of 15’8″, she was conceived to be crewed by a complement of just a handful of officers and about 250 enlisted. In her personnel she was typical of America at war. At commissioning half of her officers and nearly all of her enlisted crew were career personnel from the regular navy, but by the end of the war all but one of her officers and 80 percent of the crew were reservists, volunteers for the duration.

I was stationed on Okinawa (see Shipwrecked on the Island of Misfit Toys) when the wreck of the Emmons was “discovered.” At the time, there was quite a circus-like atmosphere surrounding the ship. Divers were getting “bent” (decompression sickness) in their overenthusiasm. People were stealing artifacts from the wreck, becoming nothing less than grave robbers. I lacked the proper equipment, training and experience at the time to conduct the decompression diving that allows a proper stay at 130’. So I left Okinawa in the summer of 2001 without experiencing this now historic wreck.

USS Emmons providing support at Normandy, 1944

USS Emmons providing support at Normandy, 1944

Almost from the beginning, Emmons was earmarked for service in the Atlantic as were most of her class of warship. 2,200 tons when fully loaded, her armament originally was optimized for anti-surface and submarine patrols and consisted of five 5 inch, 38 caliber (5”/38) Dual-Purpose (DP) guns for surface and airborne engagements, nine 21″ torpedoes to use against ships, six 50 caliber machine guns for general overall defense, and two depth charge tracks on the stern for antisubmarine warfare. However, experiences of the Americans and British early in the War of the Pacific necessitated changes while under construction, primarily in bolstering her anti-aircraft and anti-submarine capabilities. Her armament was finalized to include four 5″/38 guns, five 21″ torpedoes, two twin 40mm anti-aircraft mounts, four 20mm anti-aircraft cannons, two depth charge racks, and one depth charge thrower amidships.

Me and David celebrate another deep dive together, ~2002

Me and David celebrate another deep dive together, ~2002

David in Tech Gear

David in Tech Gear

Me ready for a sunset deco dive, ~2003

Me ready for a sunset deco dive, ~2003

I was stationed in Miami from 2001-2004, and at the time met David Ryder, the man who led me over to the darker side of technical diving. David, and Irishman who grew up in commercial diving in the North Sea, was fairly indestructible in the water, and through his somewhat unorthodox mentorship and unrelenting pressure, I found myself purchasing the thousands of dollars of tanks, harnesses, regulators, computers, and wetsuits I would need to spend over an hour in the water at depths down to 200’ plus. David and I conducted a number of very deep dives between 2001 and 2004, experience that would provide me the skills and knowhow which would come un so handy this day on the Emmons.

USS Emmons at Normandy, 1944

USS Emmons at Normandy, 1944

After supporting the Normandy invasion in the summer of 1944, the war in Europe was all but over, and Emmons shifted to face a new role in a new theater. She and many of her class were converted to high-speed Destroyer-Minesweepers and became party of Mine Sweeper Squadron 20, destination for the Western Pacific where they would help clear the way for the many invasions of Japanese islands that seem all but necessary at the time. In late 1944, DD457 had become DMS27, and during this conversion, LCDR Eugene Foss, USNR, became Commanding Officer of Emmons. By this time, the number of 20mm mounts had increased to seven, and her depth-charge system had been updated and improved. However, she lost one of her 5″/38 guns (mount No. 4 aft) during this update.

A sister-ship showing the 1945 Destroyer-Minesweeper configuration

A sister-ship showing the 1945 Destroyer-Minesweeper configuration

I found myself back on Okinawa in 2004 having volunteered to return to my old job. And this time I brought back all my deep-diving technical dive gear and knowhow, ready to explore the underwater war relics that the South Pacific provided for exploration. However, I also found myself on a no-notice, 8-month deployment to Iraq. No diving for this guy…. I returned to Okinawa to find my marriage in ruins (see Paradise Lost), and in all honesty, lost any love or drive for underwater exploration of this sort through my departure in late 2005. I again missed my opportunity to explore the Emmons.

Technical deep-diving gear on the North of Nago's charter

Technical deep-diving gear on the North of Nago’s charter

After a month’s intensive training Emmons and her squadron were temporarily broken up to escort the flood of ships concentrating in the Western Pacific for the upcoming spring 1945 Invasion of Okinawa. Emmons served as screen for convoys from Hawaii to Eniwetok and Ulithi, and from Ulithi to Okinawa where she joined the rest of her squadron. She put to sea 19 March 1945 for the dangerous, vital task of clearing Okinawa‘s waters to allow assault ships to close on the beaches for the landings scheduled to begin April 1st of 1945. Sweeping operations for the Okinawa offensive began around the Kerama Islands on March 24th. Experiencing a new ferocity of warfare at Okinawa, mine sweeping operations became the easiest and quite possibly safest task of the Destroyer-Mine-Sweeps, which as a class retained the screening, patrol, and radar-picket duties still expected of destroyers.

Quite unexpectedly, I found myself again stationed on Okinawa starting in 2013. However, this time I came to Okinawa as a retired, dependent spouse, who quickly got a job teaching scuba diving. And after almost losing my personal access to the waters of the world (see Offshore Okinawa, A Scuba Diver’s Paradise to Lose), I decided not to let any more opportunities slip idly by. This time I had the gear, the experience, the time, and finally, the opportunity.

Sister-ship USS Rodman

Sister-ship USS Rodman

On 6 April 1945, Emmons and sister-ship Rodman joined to provide protection for Sweep Unit 11 then engaged in clearance operations between Ie Shima (island) and the northwest tip of Okinawa. On that day, Imperial Japan, in desperation over their impossible military position on Okinawa and facing an impending invasion of the Homeland, launched the largest suicide attacks (by aircraft) of the entire war against ships off Okinawa, amounting to some 355 suicide missions across 6 and 7 April. The Emmons and Rodman absorbed a good portion of that destructive folly.

Fellow divers with fair winds and following seas

Fellow divers with fair winds and following seas

Okinawa Battlesites 2015, USS Emmons, deep diving WMOkinawa Battlesites 2015, USS Emmons, gun barrels WMI had planned two decompression dives for the day, both to 130’ for 14 minutes bottom time (17 minutes elapsed total time). I was diving a steel 100 cubic foot single cylinder, and carried a 40 cubic foot stag bottom full of 36% Enriched Air NITROX to accelerate my off-gassing on the way back to the surface. Since my dive buddy had banged out of the dive, and no one else had planned my particular dives, I ended up diving relatively solo, which although never a great or recommended way to dive, I found entirely refreshing. Experiencing this heroic ship and her lost crewmen in my own silent contemplation was…powerfully moving.

Kamikaze attacks were surprising, vicious, and very hard to defeat.

Kamikaze attacks were surprising, vicious, and very hard to defeat.

Damage to the USS Rodman

Damage to the USS Rodman

Kamikaze about to strike the USS Missouri

Kamikaze about to strike the USS Missouri

During one of the first of the massive kamikaze attacks, these two ships became floating targets, the focal point of Japan’s hopelessness. Although numerous raids were detected throughout the morning, the Japanese didn’t seek out these particular pickets until the middle of the afternoon. Perhaps because someone finally realized that these destroyers were actually serving as radar sentinels offering the rest of the fleet early warning, targeting priorities were shifted. Around 3:15 PM on April 6th the first of many attacks closed in on the Rodman and struck her directly on her forecastle, setting her ablaze. Emmons provided anti-aircraft covering fire as she closed at high speed to render assistance. Circling the Rodman like the good guys would in an old Western Cowboy and Indian matinée, Emmons provided the majority of protection against the now growing number of attackers in the area. Friendly fighters on Combat Air Patrol (CAP) from nearby aircraft carriers also arrived and began to engage the kamikaze. While the majority of the attackers were splashed, it wasn’t enough to change the fate of the Emmons that afternoon. As Emmons continued to circle the stricken Rodman, both sweeps were overwhelmed by suicide-murder-bent Japanese pilots and their explosive-ladened planes.

USS Emmons lays on her starboard side at ~150 feet

USS Emmons lies on her starboard side at ~150 feet

The dive boat was moored at the line attached amidships on the Emmons. As I decided in the chilly winter waters in a light current, the waters turned dark, the visibility reduced by a good deal of suspension in the vicinity. At one point I could no longer make out the surface and yet could see the wreck. But then she was there, emerging from the depths, lurking there like I imagine only a ghostly apparition would. Or could.

High School Girls wave away a Kamikaze

High School Girls wave away a Kamikaze

Kawasaki "Tony"

Kawasaki “Tony”

A Japanese "Val"

A Japanese “Val”

Japanese aircraft, including Tonys, Vals, and Zekes, continued to swarm and harass the American fleet. While Marine Corsairs and Navy Hellcats did their finest to screen the fleet, and Emmons herself shot down six of the enemy in short order that afternoon, she nonetheless took her first hit. Sheer numbers and fanatical frenzy finally ruled the day. At 1732 (5:32 PM), after over two hours of continuous intense combat, the first of five Japanese pilots crashed purposely into Emmons’ fantail. The “Divine Winds,” in a well-coordinated attack, impacted the ship in rapid succession within a two-minute timespan, hitting her fantail, pilot house, No. 3 five-inch mount on her waterline, and finally in the vicinity of her combat information center. She was quickly left crippled and ablaze. Four more attackers crashed in nearby in the waters surrounding the Emmons, all having missed their intended target but whose explosive concussions nonetheless caused additional damage.

One of the Emmons' two screws

One of the Emmons’ two screws

20mm cannon, still loaded and ready

20mm cannon, still loaded and ready

Okinawa Battlesites 2015, USS Emmons, 20mm mount 2 WMOn my first dive I proceeded towards the ship’s stern. Staying mostly above the side of her hull, I moved slowly, taking in her majesty as I focused on breathing and moving as effortlessly as possible. I realized I had failed to really study the ship; I wasn’t sure what I was looking at, and only later when I researched the Emmons for this article did I realize that the majority of her fantail had been utterly destroyed. There were, however, a 20mm cannon, still loaded with an attached magazine, and a twin 40mm antiaircraft mount, both which appeared like there were still in action, pointing skyward, searching for the now and forever missing targets. I rounded her screws, and headed back to my ascent point along the Emmons’ weatherdeck.

A twin 40mm antiaircraft mount

A twin 40mm antiaircraft mount

Okinawa Battlesites 2015, USS Emmons, illuminating the wreck WMOkinawa Battlesites 2015, USS Emmons, 5 inch 38 gun mountOn the second hit aboard Emmons Captain Foss was blown off the bridge. Since the Executive Officer was missing, LT John Griffin, USNR, the gunnery officer, assumed command and countermanded the unofficial order to abandon ship which had been circulated from an unknown source. He assessed the serious damage. The aft hull was a mangled mess and the ship’s rudder had been almost completely blown off. That combined with one of two shafts and screws being inoperable, the ship was severely limited in its mobility, one of its primary defenses against air attack. The bridge was completely destroyed and fires raged all the way forward to Mount No. 1. Firefighting was nearly impossible as exploding 20 mm rounds and ready ammunition boxes started more fires as others were extinguished, and much of the fire-fighting equipment was either missing or damaged beyond service. A ten degree starboard list was visible evidence of serious flooding, as was the fact that the stern was settling into the sea.

One of Emmons' three 5-inch mounts

One of Emmons’ three 5-inch mounts

A 5"/38 Dual Purpose Gun on the Emmons

A 5″/38 Dual Purpose Gun on the Emmons

Okinawa Battlesites 2015, USS Emmons, sights for a 40mm mount WMAfter more than an hour break on the surface, my second dive was much like the first in plan, but a wholly different experience. This time I proceeded from amidships to the bow, where I discovered the two 5”/38 gun mounts still in place and trained as if firing at attacking aircraft. These weapons, almost dwarfing the ship’s narrow structure, are the hallmark of a destroyer, still to this day. And seeing them there made the historical nature and horrific demise of this vessel hit home.

Casualties aboard the USS Emmons

Casualties aboard the USS Emmons

A memorial plaque to one of those lost

A memorial plaque to one of those lost

Okinawa Battlesites 2015, USS Emmons, open escape scuttle WMAfter taking such a tremendous beating, the ship’s whaleboat began to pick up wounded in the water and deliver them to the nearby minesweepers. The more seriously wounded were kept aboard and taken care of as well as possible; those less injured were placed on rafts over the side to wait for later rescue. The surviving elements of Emmons’ damage control parties fought heroically to put out the fires and control flooding, and for a time it appeared that the ship might be saved. As the wounded were being transferred to ships alongside, a large explosion occurred in the handling room of Mount 2 forward. With ammunition exploding wholesale, Emmons found damage control a desperate, losing struggle, necessitating an official order to abandon ship. Casualties were heavy. Among nineteen officers, eight were killed or missing-in-action and five were wounded. Of the 254 members of the crew, almost ¼ each were killed and wounded, amounting to 52 KIA or missing in action and 65 wounded.

Humpbacks sharing the day with us

Humpbacks sharing the day with us

After our dives, the humpbacks surfaced and stayed close to our dive boat. Getting ready to dive deep and perhaps have their own private moments around the Emmons, mom and calf bid us adieu with waves of their tails.

USS Ellyson DMS-19

USS Ellyson DMS-19

Okinawa Battlesites 2015, USS Emmons, 5 inch 38 gun mountOkinawa Battlesites 2015, USS Emmons, deck gear WMThe crippled Emmons herself, however, refused to give up. The burning hulk drifted all night toward Ie Shima, still held by the enemy. Early next morning, Saturday, April 7, 1945, the Navy considered the possibility of salvaging her, but ultimately ordered that she be sunk to keep her from falling into enemy hands or becoming a hazard to navigation. Emmons’ sister ship, the USS Ellyson (DD-454/DMS-19), then proceeded to shell the Emmons with 5” gunfire, and finally succeeded in doing what the Japanese could not: send Emmons to her watery grave. A sad ending for a noble ship manned, loved, and fought by a noble crew for three years, four months and two days–5 December 1941 through 7 April 1945. But all the news wasn’t so repulsive; Emmons’ heroic defense of Rodman allowed the latter to survive, and ultimately be repaired and returned to service.

Okinawa Battlesites 2015, USS Emmons, gunsight WM

The U.S. Navy still maintains custody of the wreck. More importantly, the USS Emmons remains a United States Naval vessel and as such is protected by the United States Government. More importantly, however, because of the large number of American and Japanese men still entombed aboard this ship, Emmons is and must be treated as a war grave. It is unlawful for anyone to enter the ship by any means, as is removing any materials from the ship or the debris field. It should go without saying, but if you intend to visit, please show the utmost respect for the ship and the fallen warriors all which remain on eternal patrol.

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For me personally, the song of the humpbacks will forever be associated with my first visit to the USS Emmons. I only hope that our fallen comrades enjoyed their lyrical tribute as much as I did, now and forever.

http://www.ussemmons.org/